Living Life in 3D

Those hot summer nights. I remember them clearly. The sun shining way into the evening, the last glimmer of sunlight and the moon shining in it’s fullness at the same time. Then, as it gets darker, the fireflies come out to play, and then the stars. Oh the stars. Growing up in the middle of farming country had some perks, and one of them was little light pollution. The first time I really, and I mean really, encountered the stars was on a backpacking trip in Glacier National Park in Montana here in the States. There were no city lights at all, and the stars were almost as plentiful as rain drops in a downpour. They were…something bigger….something…..more. More than I had once thought. Something grander than I had once believed.

The path of self discovery. It’s incredibly important for each and everyone of us to travel down. And, as I mentioned in an earlier post, we can’t just stop there. Though many often do, this simply leads to a one sided, one dimensional outlook on life-simply who we are. That may not sound so simple. And it’s not. We are incredibly complex. Which is why we must keep going. Going…past the point of self discovery, to the realm of self awareness. Understanding how others experience and the wake we may be leaving, is key to growth and maturity. It’s when we begin to become less self focused and more focused on those around us. Even the “other.” The ones we swear we are nothing like. Perhaps we could consider this two dimensional. And, for a mature adult, this could be the stopping point.

For me, self discovery is where I had stopped for awhile. That is until I realized for the first time, the massive wake I was leaving behind me. And I could have stopped there. Working on me and my behavior, trying to reach out to the other, or at least become more tolerant of the other. And I do continually try to learn more about my wake. But God continued to invite further. The path from this point on, just like the path up to this point, was uncharted, unknown and scary.

Looking up at the stars, that feeling of bigness, and that I am a part of that bigness, is something that invites us into it. And that is where our lives become, for lack of a better descriptor, three dimensional. It’s when we’ve gone from understanding who we are, and how others experience us, to understanding who we are IN Christ.

I have met so many people, followers of Jesus, that have no idea who they are in Christ. This key part helps us to see that we are a part of something much bigger and grander than ourselves. That we are a part of a much larger narrative, a story that is being written as we live, that God continually invites us into. We are more valuable than we could ever imagine, we are more precious than we could ever dream. I remember once hearing an interview with J. K. Rowling, the creator and author of Harry Potter. She said, “I always knew how the story would end.”She goes on to say that it was the story leading up to that end that was what brought her enjoyment and life.

And I believe Christ is the same with us. We are a part of a grand story. Each day, each moment in that presence of Christ, is another opportunity of learning about who we are from the One who created us. Who puts the very breath in our lungs. Why we are wired or gifted or skilled a certain way. Looking back on the life lived already and seeing how God used us through those things, and seeing we are a part of something much greater. Though we may seem insignificant, He desires us to be very intricate parts of it. We need to be reminded of those things from time to time. I hope you are.

be blessed today

 

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Getting Caught in the Wake

Oh, that feeling. I hate it. Man, I hate it. It doesn’t matter if the person is small, big, girl, boy, old, young. It doesn’t matter whether or not they are in a position over you or under you at work. It is still uncomfortable. Walking on egg shells. It’s just not fun.

One of the biggest issues in the American Church today, is our lack of self awareness. Or put differently, our lack of understanding how we are experienced by others. This doesn’t just come in our personal interaction with people on a moment by moment or daily basis. But it also comes in our actions and verbiage towards “the other.” “The Others” are other people with differing views, perspectives, faith, theologies and lifestyles than us. In many cases, we may even just naturally assume that everyone else agrees with us or is just like us. Especially if we are part of the same faith community.

I am just as guilty of this as anyone else. I have made (and still do, I’m sure) blanket statements, stereotypes, and rash, harsh judgements. I can be arrogant, or perhaps my self confidence can come across as arrogance. I’ve made mention before that I am a tall, large, white male. This can cause intimidation, fear, feelings of frustration and/or being inferior in others around me. Whether I am trying to bring about these feelings or not, the truth is that simply who I am and how I act can bring about those feelings. A few years ago, I probably would have scoffed at that last sentence, but I have become much more aware of my wake.

 

Last post, I started a dialogue about self discovery. I really do feel this is an important step in our growth as people and especially as followers of Jesus. As we begin to walk down that road of self discovery, we could end up in a place of great growth. But we need humility. Self discovery, if carried long enough and is added with humility, will bring about self awarenesssocial-icons-01

Self awareness is when we begin to understand the wake that we are leaving behind us. Just as a speed boat cruising along at top speed will leave a tremendous wake, so do our actions. There’s a reason why marina’s have a “no wake” policy. If a boat is racing through the marina, it can cause a lot of damage to the docks, the other boats and even the shoreline. Our wake has an impact on those around us. And often times, it is hard for us to see our wake. It’s hard for us to see or understand how others are experiencing us. This is a key area of growth for us as people, let alone as people who are trying to follow Jesus a little better everyday.

I have people who I trust, who I have given the freedom to call me out on my stuff and to call me out when my wake is leaving a path of destruction. I tell them very clearly that I may not respond well to them initially, but I do want them to call me out on it. Why? Because if they don’t, and everyone else is walking on egg shells, who will speak out? And, how will I know what destruction I am leaving if no one speaks out? The Holy Spirit is there to reveal those things to us, to convict us. I don’t know about you, but many times I am too blind to see the Spirit or to busy and self focused to hear Him.

Self awareness, how others experience us, the wake we leave behind us are just another aspect of this journey of self discovery. And yes, just like finding ourselves (how we’re wired, skilled, likes and dislikes) is important, this is where many stop and dare go no further. They don’t dare continue to walk this path of self discovery. Yet, that’s exactly what God desires us to do…..the next part of the journey….

more to come…

be blessed today

 

5Q by Alan Hirsch: A Book Review

When we look at the Church in the West, for the most part there is a major problem. When we look at the Church in America, we see this problem amplified-followers of Jesus looking to government to fix the heart issues of their society, people in the Church frustrated with needs of people not being met and therefore start a para church organization, and the Church continues to lose it’s influence on society. We’ve seen this, others have written books on it and many groups have called for a unification of the Church. But, it seems hard to figure out how.

Alan Hirsch takes this into account with his book 5Q focusing on the APEST descriptive we find in Ephesians 4-Apostle, Prophet, Evangelist, Shepherd and Teacher. Hirsch argues that, “Any attempt to restrict God’s gifts to the so-called “spiritual” gifts imparted following our conversion to Christ ignores the breadth of Scripture’s thoughts on the subject of God’s gifts to his creation and to his people.”

Before I mention what takeaways I have to implement in my own life and ministry, let me share with you some of my frustrations with the book. First, the book comes across as the “be all and end all” of what the Church should be doing. I am always wary when books suggest that they have new information that will somehow revolutionize the Church with “this one simple idea.” There really is nothing new under the sun. Because of this, the book comes across as being very prescriptive. In other words, do this and that and the Church will be fixed of all her issues and problems. Again, I am wary of books that are cast in this type of light. This is partly because it could dilute the really meat of this book into someone thinking it is just another self help book, and partly because there is nothing new under the sun. There are however, different perspectives under the sun….over six billion to be exact. Hirsch’s perspective is too important to be overlooked, so please don’t immediately put it down based on just on this paragraph. This book could be considered coming from the Prophet end of the APEST as it is a calling us back to move forward.

If the reader can overlook the presumptuousness I mentioned above, this book is incredibly helpful for the their own personal life and their ministry, no matter the context the reader is in. What I first appreciated about Hirsch’s premise is that he simplifies what needs to be done without being simplistic. As mentioned earlier, by focusing more thought and energy on these five quotients, it simplifies how we as the Church need to interact with each other. He points out that just as the Catholic Church has been splintered into different orders such as the Franciscan, Benedictine, etc., that focus on different needs of the world, so have we in the Protestant Church with our myriad of para-church organizations. This becomes complicated, divisive and almost a “survival of the fittest” contest for financial resources and partnerships.

Looking at the APEST and the spiritual gifts as an addition to these five quotients, helps us boil down to what really matters and build into those five first. This is counter cultural to the Christian world today with the amount of resources on strategy, vision, obstacles, training, leading and growing our congregations and influence. Many of these books, conferences and seminars deal with the symptoms, putting a massive amount of our energy towards those things instead of really digging down to the foundation and starting from there.

Another point I resonated deeply with 5Q is that Hirsch spends a great deal of time pointing out that Jesus exemplified all five aspects in His earthly life. He was an apostle, prophet, evangelist, shepherd and teacher and to their fullest extent. However, Hirsch also spends time reiterating the fact that we are not each called to be fully all five of these aspects. This relieves pressure so as to not have to live up to being Jesus fully, like it is so easy for me to feel. Instead, Hirsch points out that the Church needs all five. If we are the Body and Christ is the head, then we are to be the embodiment of all five with some of us being apostles, some prophets, some evangelists and so on. Striving to find those to fulfill these roles and empower them to do so, is when we are truly living out our lives as THE Body.

5Q is a calling back to the basics of who we are to be and what the Church is to be in the world in which we live. It’s a calling back to what the Early Church lived and breathed in a way that we can simplify our lives from all the distractions of fixing symptoms. And it’s a calling back to the unifying attributes we once had. Only then can we move forward in being the Body as Christ intended.

Have You Found Yourself?

I can’t pin point the exact time it happened to me. I think with most things in life, it came about slowly, over time. It evolved. In all my travels around the globe, I’ve run into many people who were on that same journey. The places I found it most prevalent were in India, Nepal, Bali, Mongolia and a few places in the States such as here in Portland. But, I have encountered folks almost everywhere I’ve been, on the path of “finding themselves.”

My assumption is that the places I found it most, were  places that were very religiously “open.” Where people would not be shamed for believing what they did, no matter how ludicrous it may have seemed to people from their own home cultures. Sure, there was acceptance, but it was more than that. It was the freedom to dive into whatever beliefs they wanted to, carry that liturgy out to whatever extent they desired (minus murdering someone), and there was no public judgement or shaming. At least, not that they could tell.

The cultures we grow up in, no matter where we are, may have some sort of religious expectations upon us (no matter how religiously free we think we think our culture is). We believe what our parents believe, or perhaps we believe what the rest of the crowd we spent the most time with believes. And then, many of us hit a point where we think “what do I actually believe?” What I’ve noticed is that when we start down that road, we then begin to ask, “Who am I?” And so the journey of self discovery begins.

I’ve seen many people on this constant journey to find themselves. Trying to figure out small things such as, “do I really like broccoli” to much deeper more profound things like “do I really believe in God?” I firmly believe this journey is incredibly important to our growth as people. Figuring out our identity, our passions, our desires is foundational in really understanding who we are. This is the point where a lot of people I know have entered into a real, or more accurate understanding  of who they are, not what the world has told them they are. This is the journey of self discovery. I think this is an incredible moment in a person’s life. This is when people begin to really start to live in who they are. Finding themselves.

And then they stop. Or, they never add to this part of their journey. Don’t get me wrong, we need to be life long learners and learners of life. But that doesn’t mean staying in just this place.  It begins with asking the questions, “Who am I?” That could be a scary question, especially for a people pleaser like me. For a long time, and I still struggle with it, I was only who I was as long as people liked me, weren’t upset with me and who still accepted me. Simply put, to a point, I was a chameleon, able to blend in to any group, or more accurately, I took on the personality, likes/dislikes and interests of the group.

This lasted for a while, until I got to the point I realized I had no idea who I actually was. I couldn’t dissect me from them (whoever “them” was at the time). Again, I can’t pin point when it started, but it was somewhere around the senior year of high school and freshman year of college. And it has not ended since then. I am still discovering who I am. But I have added to the things I am learning about myself. We’ll tackle that in the next two posts. For today, perhaps it’s good to reflect and simply ask ourselves, “do I know who I am?”

More to come…

be blessed today