Time To Tear Down The Walls

Oh those moments of panic. The plane drops 100 feet in altitude, the car spits and sputters while you’re in the middle of nowhere, your cell phone dies when you don’t know where you are, your child gets lost in a crowded subway stop, mall or venue…these are the times it seems that our dependence on God spikes to 200% more than it did in the moment prior. I’ve been there…actually in all of those situations, and I start silently saying prayers of safety, uttering my dependence on God, crying out for help.

Yep. I get it.

In those times when we’re lost, confused, there’s a loss of control, not sure what to do next, feeling powerless because, well, we are. Completely. Totally.

And then, sadly, when things become more clear, more stable, it seems that I have less time and dependence on God. At least in my life, that’s the cycle that I go through, instead of just simply being dependent on Him all the time.

I’ve been talking about dependency on and intimacy with God the past couple of posts (starting with this one here). I posed the question last time, asking, “what if the idea of having a church building wasn’t God’s intention for us.” This isn’t my idea, but something I’ve been exploring. I’m beginning to believe that the Temple of Solomon was actually never what God wanted. God describes in great detail how the tabernacle, the moveable tent that was continually filled with the presence of God, was to be made. In fact, God speaks and Moses records chapters of minute detail. But when it comes to the temple, it appears to be David’s idea. David has this time of feeling bad that he lives in a palace and beacause of this, has a desire to build a temple. God even says to David that He never asked anyone to build a temple. As in Romans 1 where God gives men over to their selfish desires, it appears that God does the same with David. But says, “well, if you’re going to do what you want to do, ok, but you will not build it, your son will” (1 Chronicles 17:4) And even in this, David ignores and makes the plans, funding and even gives the word to build it, not Solomon.

Just like in those times where we have an utter loss of control and are thrust into situations where we make the choice to lean into God, give him total control and become dependent on Him, Israel was the same way those 40 years in the wilderness and as they entered the Promised Land. Wandering, walking, traveling, journeying, that’s what they did non stop. They were guided day in and day out by a pillar of fire and a pillar of clouds. Water came from rocks, bread from heaven, the crumbling of fortified cities with the simple blast of trumpets, and the continual presence of God.

But then things stabilized, the decision to build a temple was made, and that continual dependence on God was replaced with Pharisaical law, rote liturgical practices, and the belief that God is only present in the temple…not anywhere else. This is opposite from what God had intended. His intention was Eden, of course, strolling through the orchard, in between the vines of grapes. And the wilderness was similar, walking together, being together, talking together.

Today, we have grand temples, built for kings. We have buildings that are being well used, but the belief that that is the only place where ministry can happen or the only place where God is present, still remains. We “go to church” dismissing the Truth that we are a part of the church in the world, meant to be the hands and feet of Christ…maybe before we are the mouthpiece of Him. We put great belief in our liturgy-and yes EVERY church has liturgy, not just the Catholic or Orthodox faith traditions-that if we do it this way, we are good for another week.  We have replaced intimacy with structure, dependence on God with our isolation.

Today, I hope we begin to mentally tear down the walls of our temples that are imprisoning us from being the Church to those around us. I  hope we begin to see passed the walls, that we can look at our neighbors through the Church, look at those around us through scripture, and look at Christ beyond our liturgy that may bar us away from intimacy. That is my prayer for the Church and the American church.

be blessed today

 

 

Photo credit: http://www.designmom.com

 

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